What you should say to a car dealer?

Let's face it, buying a car is the worst kind of psychological warfare. The comings and goings between you and the vendors can be exhausting and excruciating. And while there are many things you need to consider when negotiating the slippery slope of an auto business, and things you should listen to that the seller could say, there are also some things that you, as a buyer, can say to get inside the seller's mind and get the best deal possible. These are phrases that will disarm, confuse and put car salespeople on the defensive.

In the psychological battle that takes place at car dealerships, words are often your best weapon. Here are 10 phrases that will help you when buying your next car. Car salespeople know you're more likely to buy a car if you love it. When you say a phrase like “I like this car.

But I don't love it, you're telling the seller that they have to offer you more to commit to a vehicle that looks good to you but doesn't drive you crazy. This phrase of yours is likely to be followed by phrases from the seller such as “What would make you love? and “How about I put in a one-year subscription to satellite radio? or “Let me see what I can do with the cost of an extended warranty. Apparently less interested in the car, you pressure the seller to sweeten the offer and convince you to buy the car you are looking for. Never seem too enthusiastic about a particular vehicle.

Play it easy and you'll be rewarded with upgrades, additional options and a better price. Car salespeople work on a commission basis, which means that the more vehicles they can sell and the faster they can sell them, the more money they make. This means that the words “I'll buy it right now” are music to the seller's ears. But buying a car right away depends on you getting the price you want.

You'll be amazed at how hard salespeople will work to get the price you demand if they feel you're serious about buying a vehicle then and there. Just make sure you stick to your weapons. Always keep in mind a maximum price you are willing to pay and never exceed it. And use the fact that you are willing to act quickly on a purchase as an advantage for the sales staff.

This is one of the best ways to get the deal you want on a new or used vehicle. Ask most car salespeople what they hate more than anything else and they'll tell you “indecision.”. No salesman wants to spend time stuck with a customer who is indecisive and who hems and snores a vehicle. They certainly don't want you to spend time testing a car several times.

Once again, time is money for these people and they want to close the deal as soon as possible. By making it look like you're warm with a car or you're not sure, you'll put more pressure on the seller to sell you the car and close the deal. Also, when you finally bid on a vehicle, the seller will be so happy that they probably don't realize the fact that you've drastically lowered the price. Hopefully that's the case anyway.

Since all young children learn before the age of two, “no” is the most powerful word in any language. Just by saying “no” to car salespeople, you leave them defenseless and give yourself full power in a transaction. And you can say “no” to just about anything at a car dealership. You can say “no” to administrative fees, the current interest rate charged when financing a vehicle purchase, an extended warranty, and cloth protection on car seats, to name just a few.

And the more often you say “no,” the more your sales people have to work to gain their trust, win your business, and close the deal. Remember, you are under no obligation to purchase a particular vehicle at a certain price. If Salespeople Want Your Business, They Must Meet Your Demands. And if they don't, just tell them “no thanks.

At CarsDirect, we have partnered with special finance dealers for more than 20 years. To be assigned to a dealer in our network that has high-risk lenders, complete our free auto loan application form. We'll get to work finding a dealership in your local area with bad credit resources. Unless you're buying from an in-house financing dealership, also called a “buy here pay here” dealer, any other car salesman just wants to know that they can get financing.

Don't be afraid to say no if something doesn't feel right at some point in your car buying process. The car salesman is basically the gatekeeper who stands between you and your new car when you shop at a dealership. By not giving sellers your credit card right away, you're forcing them to work harder to come to an agreement with you and secure your credit card. It's to make you feel trapped and you have to make a deal and buy a car to get your credit card back.

The profit margin on the sale price of a vehicle can be reduced, so car dealers make money in other ways as well. Understand that Chuck may want a deposit or even an agreement that he is going to buy the car that comes from Dealership B. The common view is that car dealers prefer customers to finance their car purchase so that they can charge high interest rates and earn additional money during the repayment period. Each dealer sends customer satisfaction surveys for every new car sold, and the salesperson will receive a bonus if the cumulative survey scores are above a certain average.

While car dealerships can have an unpleasant reputation, most salespeople are just trying to make a living in an industry where having to meet quotas and increase sales are the norm. Telling them that you are evaluating the car professionally will make salespeople nervous and pressure them to change your current car then and there, before its true value is known. Want to sell you a more expensive car, extending the loan term and reducing your monthly payments, or switching to a lease. If you plan to pay cash or finance, be sure to ask the seller for the “retail” price, which is the final price for the car with all necessary taxes and fees.

Most dealers prefer customers to buy cars directly with cash or with their personal line of credit, especially on used vehicles that have discounts and are not as expensive as a new car. . .